• Cold Mountain Dry Rice Koji

Reviews

Average Rating:
(based on 4 reviews)
Smooth Order
My order arrived in a timely manner. Shipping was fast. No issues with the packaging. I look forward to fermenting the rice and cooking with it in the coming weeks. Helpful instructions are included in the packaging.
by Matt
Cooking with Koji
I am so lucky to be able to be taught how to use it on steak. First it was marinated on steak for 2 days, washed off, in this case they used a tenderizer as it was not an expensive steak, so marinate, rinse, add pepper, salt and garlic and WOW, great steak that taste way above its price! This is the best part of chefshop, you get introduced to the coolest new things we can use for exciting cooking.
by Louise
Easy to use with incredible results
After hearing about Shio Koji, a lot, it was time to give it a try. With Cold Mountain Koji it was as simple as adding the Koji rice, some water and salt. After 10 days +1 it was ready. Since then I have tried it on and in just about everything. Fish, meats, vegetables, anywhere I would normally add a dash of salt, including on my eggs. The effect has ranged from subtle to profound. This is my new secret ingredient. Combine it with a good soy sauce for even more effect in stir fry or fried rice. Marinate meats before grinding them into sausage or even in burgers. The possibilities are many. If you are into fermenting then definitely give this a try. You will be back for seconds...
by Alan
Amazake Lover.
I truly enjoy amazake beverage but it has become unavailable at local health food stores. I was intrigued to find koji was the secret to making it. I was hooked. So I ordered the first koji I could find from Japan. Then I discovered Cold Mountain an American company with a great track record with miso making, sold koji. Now I'm exploring all things koji. Thanks to the great new book Koji Alchemy and Cold Mountain.
by Dennis
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Cold Mountain Dry White Rice Koji 

20 oz California

As featured on Netflix series, SALT FAT ACIDHEAT

 with Samin Nosrat

 

Koji is one of the key ingredients used to make miso. Koji is made from steamed rice inoculated with "koji starter", consisting of spores of the mold ASPERGILLUS ORYZAE, then incubated for about 45 hours until each kernel of rice is covered with a bloom of fragrant white mold. The rice is then dried, preserving the mold on the outside of the rice kernals.

The function of mold is to produce enzymes that will later break down the soy (or whatever base is used) proteins, carbohydrates and oil into their amino acids, sugars and lipids - to make them more readily digestible or then use them in another process -- such as fermenting simple sugars into alcohol, such as when you make sake.

Note that Koji is never consumed raw.  It is common tool used in japanese and high-end restaurants, but whether used in making miso, tofu or soy sauce, koji is always part of a process and is always eventually cooked (miso when used as an ingredient) or fermented further (sake or rice wine vinegar or miso).

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I suspect that those who say Koji is not magic, don’t believe in magic. Even when they see right before their very eyes. For some things in life, explanations are only there to take the fear away from that which cannot be explained.

Koji was crafted 9000 years ago, most likely under another name, in an earthen jar in China and it has been a staple of food alchemy ever since. Just not so much here, at least not until recently.

To many it is the newest food rage, in fact, it is not a food, but a tool that harbors amazing little workers who can transform and change how and what we eat in ways that would never seem possible.

There is a lot of science in Koji. Papers have been written about the subject. Some are “dry”, long winded, and some so crusty they seem fermented themselves.

If you are interested in it, read the book “Koji Alchemy” by Rich Shih and Jeremy Umansky, from your local bookshop. It is new this year and quite a spectacular read. If you want recipes for Koji, this "cookbook" is the place to get them and understand “it”, too.

This domesticated mold was originally derived from a toxic mold and before people start writing, it is not toxic now. This mold has a long history of making amazing food and alcohol.

Koji is a million spores, a thousand knives, cutting up the cells of proteins to make a better eating experience.

Perhaps the best thing about Koji is that it inspires you to explore in the kitchen. Throw out preconceptions, what you thought was true is by the wayside, and spread the love of Koji on your meat, your veggies, your meals, so that life is renewed, optimistic; and a place where change can make things taste good at the same time as being the same.

Think of it as mold that is your friend and not your enemy. Once you get to know it you will find it can make your life better. And once you get used to it all, pretty much it will seem normal, like a friend that you always wished you had. Yes, it is different, but that is ok.

It is that difference that we all enjoy when it comes to enlightening our palates. It truly is a great way to expand our life and make our tongues happy! Transform the mundane to the insane.

 

To start, use Koji on a steak, or really any protein of your choice, by taking the rice (the vehicle to carry the spores) and grinding it up in a blender to make a powder. Then rub on your meat.

You can add spices, salt, really, most everything you normally do that is dry; whatever flavors you’re used to. Place on a rack over a pan, for 48 hours in the fridge for good results. Really that's it. Scrape the crust off and rinse. Cook as you normally do, just a little shorter.

The use of koji with food is really about the fifth dimension, changing the composition so your taste is rewarded; it is magic! Think of changing and making food better with just a little koji dust!

Keep in mind, doing it correctly keeps you safe when dealing with raw meats. Use an established recipe first.