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1 lb (16 oz) - Washington
Not suitable for sprouting


Einkorn cooks up very much like Emmer or Farro. However, it is softer than Emmer, so it does cook-up a little faster, especially if you like that al dente texture.

The most popular way to cook it is to boil it. 1 cup Einkorn to 5 cups water or chicken stock. Simmer on medium heat, stirring occasionally, maintaining a calm boil for 20-30 minutes or so. Simmer until all the liquid is absorbed.

About Einkorn:
Rene Featherstone, agricultural expert extraordinaire, explains that Einkorn is an ancient grain; an early ancestor of wheat that originated in the Fertile Crescent one million years ago. He ordered a handful of seeds from a seed bank in Idaho to start this field, and to his knowledge, he is the first person cultivating Einkorn in the US.

Rene Featherstone has worked in agriculture all his life, including agricultural journalism. He is an expert in ancient and modern wheat and other exotic grains. Most recently, his passion for knowledge has taken him backwards in time and grow an ancient grain called Einkorn. Grown in Germany and many other parts of the world, This may be the first field of Einkorn grown in the US. If all goes well, this crop will be harvested in August and stored in silos until the fall.

Rene, along with Lena Lentz of Lentz Family Farms, produce some of the finest hard grains in the world. Farro, which means "hard grains", includes Emmer and Spelt. The use of these grains flours produces wonderful pizza crusts and breads. It is the passion to produce grains that have superior nutritional value that brings Rene backwards in time to the origins of grains!

To read more about Rene and Einkorn, please CLICK HERE

Keywords: einkorn, grain
$9.99
SKU:
1600
AVAILABILITY:
This is available
QUANTITY:
 
Discounts Available
  • buy at least 12, save 8%
  • buy at least 6, save 5%